Celebrity News

Mandy Moore Reaches Mount Everest Base Camp as Death Toll Rises to 11

“This Is Us” star Mandy Moore has made it to the Mount Everest Base Camp in Nepal during a deadly year on the mountain.

View this post on Instagram

There is so much magic in these mountains. They represent adventure in the grandest form and in a language all their own. The idea of standing at the base of the world's tallest peak with @eddiebauer, a brand that has been outfitting record-setting climbers since the beginning - from the first American ascent in 1963 (Jim Whittaker) to our guide @melissaarnot, the first American Woman to ascend and descend Everest without oxygen, is truly beyond my wildest imagination. Traversing this terrain has its challenges. Breathing at altitude, for instance, is not easy. One of the greatest gifts/lessons that Melissa simultaneously bestowed on us during this trek was the fine art of pressure breathing. It makes all the difference as you climb higher. It’s essentially a big inhale and a sharp, forceful exhale, like you’re blowing out a candle across the room, to open up your lungs, allowing you to use more oxygen, etc... Besides hydration and staying nourished, breathing is THE vital key in the fight against altitude sickness. It’s also a major takeaway that I will be employing back to the real world whether I’m in the midst of a tough workout or a weird day. Mind blown. So as we weaved around the Himalayas from 14,400ft-16,200ft-17,600ft: this particular technique was essential in propelling us forward. Needless to say, this part of the world holds a very special place in @melissaarnot’s heart so her willingness to share it, as well as her time, knowledge and endless trove of stories were so appreciated by all of us lucky enough to walk alongside her this past week. Her belief in our abilities to keep moving and ultimately make it to the base of the Mighty, Mighty Mt. Everest was so powerful. Spoiler alert: we made it!!! It’s impossible to be lucky enough to arrive at the foot of these mammoth peaks and not be attuned to the palpable energy of all of those who came before and lost their lives in these mountains. The wave of emotion: respect, reverence, appreciation....that washed over us as we took in the prayer flags and yellow domed tents of basecamp AND sat on the rocks regarding the chortens that dot the hillside of the Tukla Pass the day before, profoundly

A post shared by Mandy Moore (@mandymooremm) on

It was a major accomplishment for the star, who hiked for about a week through Nepal before reaching the camp at 17,700 feet.

Mandy was on the adventure with Eddie Bauer, and was joined by friends Ashley Streicher and Chase Weideman, as well as their guide Melissa Arnot Reid.

Ahead of the trip, she told “Extra’s” Renee Bargh she had done a little altitude training, explaining, “We are going to about 18,000 feet, so it isn’t too, too crazy. I’m just excited… We’ve got some medication in case the altitude sickness gets us, but we are prepared.”

She also felt compelled to explain to her Instagram followers that reaching base camp is very different than hiking to the summit. Before embarking on the hike, she told followers, “If all goes well, we will have completed what is only 1/6 of the entire trip for someone who actually climbs (8 weeks total). We stand in awe of the fortitude and training and superhuman strength it takes to attempt a feat like Everest and are deeply honored just to be here and feel the Khumbu vibes.”

After her team reached their goal and made it to the base camp, she wrote on Instagram, “There is so much magic in these mountains. They represent adventure in the grandest form and in a language all their own.”

She added, “Traversing this terrain has its challenges. Breathing at altitude, for instance, is not easy... Besides hydration and staying nourished, breathing is THE vital key in the fight against altitude sickness. It’s also a major takeaway that I will be employing back to the real world whether I’m in the midst of a tough workout or a weird day. Mind blown.”

Moore paid tribute to the hikers who have lost their lives, saying, “It’s impossible to be lucky enough to arrive at the foot of these mammoth peaks and not be attuned to the palpable energy of all of those who came before and lost their lives in these mountains. The wave of emotion: respect, reverence, appreciation....that washed over us as we took in the prayer flags and yellow domed tents of basecamp AND sat on the rocks regarding the chortens that dot the hillside of the Tukla Pass the day before, profoundly.”

So far, 11 Everest hikers have died trying to reach the summit this season. According to The Washington Post, one of the contributing factors is overcrowding. When too many people try to ascend at once, it creates a backlog, leaving climbers at deadly altitudes for an extended amount of time.

Experts tell the paper that a longer hiking season could spread out the hikers. They also believe stricter requirements and more training could help reduce deaths.

Comments